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File: bd35f8871267dfb⋯.jpg (4.85 MB, 5008x3320, 626:415, It. Just. Keeps. Growing.jpg)

 No.13968[Last 50 Posts]

Post the last book(s) you have read. It would be nice if you add a synopsis or review as well, but it's not a requirement. Just seeing a snapshot of what other image-board anons are reading is itself awesome.

New feature for 2018! This thread is set to Cycle mode. Here's to a forever book reading thread.

____________________________
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Post last edited at

 No.13969

File: 3d9ff8d4261d57e⋯.jpg (25.94 KB, 311x474, 311:474, Storm of Steel.jpg)

File: d9fff6d1a6cd561⋯.jpg (43.13 KB, 341x499, 341:499, Lost Dramas of Classical A….jpg)

File: 157a7dc6fe3e656⋯.jpeg (8.32 KB, 191x293, 191:293, Antiphon and Andocides.jpeg)

File: b4603e4615d0588⋯.jpg (49.28 KB, 355x499, 355:499, The Complete Fiction of H.….jpg)

File: ae20fd256759d8c⋯.jpg (47.14 KB, 323x499, 323:499, The Sorrows of Young Werth….jpg)

>>13968

Here is an archive:

http://archive.is/aQDKR

I've almost read five books since

>>13663

Storm of Steel by Ernst Junger

Lost Dramas of Classical Athens—Greek Tragic Fragments

[The Speeches of] Antiphon and Andocides

The Complete Fiction of H.P. Lovecraft

The Sorrows of Young Werther by Goethe

But I should clarify a book. I started reading Lovecraft with "The Shadow over Innsmouth" around the time of this post:

>>13067

and around the time of this post

>>12435

I read 200 pages of Lovecraft between the second and third book of Aristophanes' comedies.

I'll have finished Werther in a day or two.

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 No.13971

>>13969

Reverse:

>>13067

>>12435

I forgot to mention that I read the first book of Euclid's Elements.

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 No.13977

Currently reading Influence by Robert Cialdini. It's a book that discusses how various thing influence people to make decisions. Psychology is a new interest for me as of late.

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 No.14008

The Peloponnesian War was breddy gud. Useful for understanding war on a basic level. Numerous lessons can be learned about internal pressure, external pressure, war fatigue, the cult of personality, the effects of culture on policy, deception, the barriers to creating lasting peace, the difficulties of forging alliances, tactical innovation, and honestly so much more. Gets a little dry at points though, and you feel like you've learned most of the lessons 2/3rds of the way through the book. At that point you just keep reading for the history.

World Order was okay. The first few chapters are really insightful, but as soon as Kissinger shifts his focus to specific policy recommendations or the future, you cant help but mistrust him. While he's intelligent, he's not as knowledgeable as he would need to be to write this book 100% accurately. Still though, the first few chapters about the development of modern international relations was really top notch.

The Passion of the Western Mind was really another great book from Tarnas. He manages to give the reader a brief overview of numerous philosophical schools of thought, but also arranges them in a way where it is clear how they built upon and reacted to one another. The progression of thought in Western history is made clear and intelligible.

The Holographic Universe is a good book too. It's pretty /fringe/-tier, but definitely worth a read if you're into that kinda stuff. I'm not 100% sure about his sources, and I didn't bother checking them but I feel he may have stretched them to fit his ideas. I can't say that with a certainty though, that's just what I felt. Definitely a fascinating book if you have the time. Could potentially revolutionize the way you see the world.

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 No.14009

>>14008

Won't let me post pictures idk why. The books are: The Peloponnesian War by Donald Kagan, World Order by Henry Kissinger, The Passion of the Western Mind by Richard Tarnas, and The Holographic Universe by Michael Talbot.

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 No.14026

I've been reading through Mishima's Sea of Fertility series. I'm about a third of the way through The Temple of Dawn now, and I have to say that all the most dull parts of his previous two in the series seem like they're magnified in this one so far. While I normally appreciate his flowery metaphors, his description of Wat Arun is agonizing to read through. Maybe that's the point, seeing as the temple itself is a fractalesque fever dream, but it doesn't add to the work at all. Even worse is the increasingly frequent text dumps of Buddhist metaphysics. While the description of Hinduism was powerful and evocative in the way he is renowned for, the chapter upon chapter of competing schools of Buddhist thought just feel like a dull textbook. I forgave the inclusion of the full text of The League of the Divine Wind in Runaway Horses because there's no really getting around it, but this treatise felt largely unnecessary. Fortunately, everything else is top notch. Can't wait to get to The Decay of the Angel.

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 No.14033

>>14009

Are you jewish?

the last book i read was enders game. it was one of those books that everyone should read. it really set me off intellectually. kind of childish thou…

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 No.14045

File: 1d24cb22f9872c2⋯.webm (4.31 MB, 270x360, 3:4, lee mee alon.mp4.webm)

>>14026

Just finished The Temple of Dawn, thought of this video, and can't stop laughing.

The second part of the book was an interesting contrast to the first. It definitely grew on me now that I've read the whole thing. The more I reflect, the more I see each and every part dripping with symbolism. All the elements of the second part, seemingly disparate and cluttered, start to converge as you consider them. Definitely a top 3 story from him so far, though I've barely scratched the surface. A tragedy nobody translates his works anymore, though after hearing the commentary of the ones that did, I certainly understand why.

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 No.14049

File: 9048042d3902425⋯.jpeg (96.92 KB, 960x674, 480:337, Oordered.jpeg)

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 No.14052

>>14009

>Won't let me post pictures idk why.

Presumably, you are on Tor. 8chan blocks Tor image posting as a global policy. There's nothing the BO can do to change this. Otherwise, it's an 8chan glitch, de régulier.

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 No.14069

File: 17e5fd194dcd434⋯.jpg (12.51 KB, 260x399, 260:399, 15994601.jpg)

My first Chesterton

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 No.14077

>>14069

How did you like it?

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 No.14082

File: a73adf1b586d1f4⋯.jpg (348.08 KB, 1400x2257, 1400:2257, 81JnjhJ9RYL.jpg)

File: 5740c03b2ba5981⋯.jpg (370.49 KB, 1400x2290, 140:229, 81yzuu3cfkL.jpg)

File: d63ba11af209823⋯.jpg (521.8 KB, 1400x2280, 35:57, 91dgNfbm1WL.jpg)

File: 3c6ba19fbd3ecb9⋯.jpg (39.2 KB, 320x500, 16:25, 51XBodiqMiL.jpg)

File: 2af723adb984fb2⋯.jpg (142.73 KB, 773x1000, 773:1000, 71KLv-x6Y5L.jpg)

March of Titans: Very interesting and enjoyable, lots of information

Went on a two day binge and read "The Third Kingdom," "Severed Souls," and "Warheart." Started with "Wizard's First Rule" back when it came out, wanted to finally finish the series. They were decent enough for "turn brain off and relax" fantasy. If you're familiar with the series, the first three books were great, then there were a bunch in the middle that were bloated garbage, and then these last three were pretty ok. 6/10 overall.

Currently reading Tolkien's translation of Beowulf. Will report back when done.

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 No.14085

File: 87e6fce6031169e⋯.jpg (78.7 KB, 499x749, 499:749, night-land.jpg)

I decided to do some light reading for a change so picked The Nigh Land. I was somewhat miffed when the version I got had excised almost half of the book, but in the end I was glad about it. The book was a heady read, as the prose was bizarre in a horrible way, and paragraphs and sometimes even whole pages could go yammering about absolutely nothing when they weren't repeating something that had just been said. And maybe modern times have ruined me, but I felt the background romance also had weird pedo vibe as the romantic interest was so ridiculously innocent she appeared pre-teen despite all the suffering she had experienced. It didn't help the book didn't feature any dialogue, so gauging her personality had to be done through the obtuse first-person narration of the main character.

I'm still glad I read it. The setting was weird and interesting, and I like stories of journeys through strange worlds, so this one really emphasizes what not to do when writing those.

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 No.14091

>>13968

On the Secret of Degeneration by Julius Evola. He talks about how societies end up degenerating and falling, and that even societies that remain completely isolated racially like an island, still somehow fall or lose their cultural tradition.

He's very spiritual and focused heavily on traditional beliefs and values. Anyone else read some his work?

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 No.14104

>>14091

He's next up on my list, how's the writing?

I just finished What We Talk About When We Talk About Love by Raymond Carver. I enjoyed it.

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 No.14106

>>14091

What are his arguments that a tribe would because I would think that it would first have to achieve a level of human superfluity.

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 No.14150

I haven't finished it yet but I'm reading "Might is Right". It's fantastic and a good life guide. Unlike leftists it doesnt say "everything is the fault of the rich who are constantly oppressing you and you are a victim". Unlike rightists it doesnt say "everything is the fault of the jews who are slowly eradicating you from the planet and making you suffer in the process". Unlike centrists or liberals or others it doesnt say "everything is fine, we're all doing well, we just need to preserve this particular voting/political process and all is well and everyone is good and important".

It says "the best take everything and the powerless suffer", which is a great life guide as it teaches you to either accept suffering as a worthless powerless idiot/indolent or to ascend to greatness if you can or want to.

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 No.14151

File: f9997821b658cf0⋯.jpg (62.84 KB, 420x645, 28:43, serveimage (3).jpg)

The Last Fighting Tommy

A biography of Harry Patch, the last serving British WW1 veteran

A couple highlights include

>Harry is attacked by a German soldier, but chooses to wound him in the leg and shoulder rather than kill him

>Harry comes across a dying British soldier, guts everywhere, who asks Harry to shoot him

>Before Harry can pull out his revolver, the soldier dies, and his last words were "Mother!" as if he was surprised to see her

It's not a long book but worth a read if you're interested in the First World War, or Edwardian Britain.

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 No.14156

File: e969eed6fbf903e⋯.jpg (46.77 KB, 329x499, 329:499, Apollodorus.jpg)

File: 490949d2345a67d⋯.png (49.71 KB, 971x427, 971:427, Ego and Own.png)

>>13969

I've read

The Library of Greek Mythology by Apollodorus

The Religious Attitudes of the Indo-Europeans

volkischpaganism.files.wordpress.com/2014/11/hans-f-k-gunther-the-religious-attitudes-of-the-indo-europeans.pdf

The Influence of Marcus Tullius Cicero on Modern Legal and Political Ideas by Mortimer N. S. Sellers

ojs.unito.it/index.php/COL/article/viewFile/1446/1277

Wyndham Lewis: From Proudhon to Hitler (and back): the Strange Political Journey of Wyndham Lewis by Alan Munton

journals.openedition.org/erea/220

The first half of The Ego and His Own by Stirner

theanarchistlibrary.org/library/max-stirner-the-ego-and-his-own#fn_back38

Apollodorus was a dry read, although I'm uncertain if that's the fault of the text itself or translator. I had a few contentions with the Indo-Euro. work, but overall was an enjoyable read. Currently, reading the second half of The Ego and His Own, The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit, and a Conan story.

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 No.14217

I just finished Jurassic Park yesterday, it's neat to compare it to the movie and see just how much is different

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 No.14229

Time's Eye (Arthur Clarke, Stephen Baxter) is alright. It's apparently related but unrelated to the Odyssey series, which I haven't read. It doesn't feel in depth, the Eyes' controllers' motivations in particular are not very inspired, but it's a fun story about being lost in time.

The sequel, Sunstorm, took the interesting ideas and forgot about them around the third chapter. It throws a bunch of ideas related to the sun and the near future, but too superficially. The main plot of the book is fine, but unlike the first book, it feels like there are too many unrelated things.

I won't finish the third book, Firstborn. It feels like more of the second, but in space.

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 No.14276

Collected Short Fiction of Bruce Jay Friedman. Not my favorite but alright. Maybe it's because I had just read a bunch of Cheever and not many short story collections could hold up to his?

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 No.14277

File: 56b11359a707046⋯.jpeg (86.48 KB, 441x751, 441:751, cover.jpeg)

The Colour of Magic, first book of the Discworld series.

I've read comments from dozens of people saying this book series is good, so I gave it a try.

The book didn't manage to make me laugh, think, be impressed or even care about the characters.

There is an "Oh so wacky!" fantasy world that feels like it was made by a child trying to be GM for the first time. The little amount of plot it starts with is forgotten after the first chapter and the rest of the book is spent following two uninteresting men wandering without objective.

The characters barely even act. Every problem they face is solved by random coincidence and/or the gods changing the world to keep the main character alive, which removes any sense of conflict or accomplishment.

I feel cheated.

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 No.14278

>>14277

I don't get it either. Now, I don't want to be too elitistic, as I like all sorts of crap too. People can like their zany nonsense and shallow parody, but there's several dozen of these and who knows how much licensed merchandise. I'd imagine anyone would get bored more sooner than later.

Some claim the books only get good after a few instalments, but those just insert the author's soapboxing and any attempt in them to be serious is sabotaged by the inherent arbitary wackyness.

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 No.14279

File: e69ad30ce33fe10⋯.jpg (18.23 KB, 300x400, 3:4, anunquietmind.jpg)

An Unquiet Mind

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 No.14301

File: 9151f0727955179⋯.jpg (43.22 KB, 268x400, 67:100, 63913.jpg)

quickly rising on my favorite authors list

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 No.14316

>>13968

The Count of Monte Cristo. That book was fucking amazing.

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 No.14350

>>13968

Just read Watership Down and I choked up at the end

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 No.14482

File: 292d66a1b06bebf⋯.jpg (308.67 KB, 1538x2000, 769:1000, pan-painted-diamonds-are-f….jpg)

Just finished Diamonds are Forever by Ian Fleming, certainly better than the film I can tell you that much. I like how Fleming's novels go into excruciating detail over every single nook and cranny James Bond comes across. Pic very related, it's the exact copy that I own.

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 No.14514

American Gods.

I couldn't help but pity Odin, at least a little at the end.

Shadow and Laura were really sweet at times; and I liked how she kept going just for him.

>"It doesn't matter that you never believed in us. We believed in you."

Bast was purrfect.

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 No.14521

File: e0dc5a1bd78b288⋯.jpg (41.19 KB, 333x500, 333:500, 516EomaafyL.jpg)

File: bfefbfc558bb31d⋯.jpg (37.98 KB, 331x499, 331:499, 51KjORxWooL._SX329_BO1,204….jpg)

File: 8ed82985b6a5bc6⋯.jpg (1.51 MB, 1000x1543, 1000:1543, b7fcbd4a-bc40-460f-9755-8c….jpg)

File: eead98634ed6f0b⋯.jpg (26.44 KB, 306x475, 306:475, 133164.jpg)

Finished all these in the span of two weaks

Spice and Wolf vol 2

Kraft and Holo try to figure out a way to get out of a financial crisis using a shepardess.

The Hellbound Heart

Some guy seeks the ultimate pleasure but the cenobites definition of pleasure is far from pleasurable to the human skin. Later and ex lover finds out about what has a happened to him and she learns how far she will go to be with him again.

Some poetry from TS Eliot

Poetry shit goes way over my head so I couldnt really tell you what I read.

Bruges La Morte

Hugues wife died leaving him a widow the only thing he does now is live his life in suffering in Bruges until he meets a woman that looks exactly like his dead wife.

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 No.14534

File: 4561e314525c846⋯.jpg (23.79 KB, 307x460, 307:460, the-age-of-reason-by-thoma….jpg)

The Age of Reason by Thomas Paine.

Synopsis Part 1: The OT is a bunch of fairy-tales. The book of Job doesn't fit in. The OT Jews were a bunch of ISIS-level savages, and the OT god was an evil bastard (who really hates jews).

Synopsis Part 2: The NY is a commissioned collection of made-up stories about a really nice guy and a God who isn't all that nice. It makes no sense and the morality is questionable.

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 No.14542

Behead All Satans by MNM-DR

Contemporary. Diary form. A dark humor descent into madness.

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 No.14559

File: c8d82bd689a4fe2⋯.jpg (45.32 KB, 332x499, 332:499, 51WxiBn2GUL._SX330_BO1,204….jpg)

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

Its about a man who has a very mild form of autism that goes looking for a wife. He first makes a questionnaire to "find the perfect woman" but that falls to the side when he meets a girl name Rosie. Rosie is everything he doesn't like in a woman but puts that to the side to help her find her biological father. This begins a long chain of wacky events that only an high functioning autistic man could get into.

I forced to read this book, as my aunties loved it half a decade ago. The writing style flows fairly well for the autistic man, really taking your hand to experience a different mindset that is quite different from a normal perspective. The one thing that really got my attention was the subtle story telling for all the characters around the autistic man. As he is somewhat autistic, you see little glimpses that he ignores but have a very big impact for his friends. I don't see that in the novels i read and would like to emulate that type of story telling if i ever write.

Verdict: If you want something little weird but sweet, give this book a go.

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 No.14585

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami

A man who was abandoned by his closest group of friends tries to find the answer years later.

I loved reading this. It had elements of the supernatural, mystery, and deep reflection that I really took to liking.

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 No.14611

File: 17728b36decdc94⋯.png (10.61 KB, 203x248, 203:248, Clement of Alexandria.png)

Last book I've read was Clement of Alexandrias Stromata, if I am not mistaken.

It's so disordered and unsystematic that it makes the early von Kuehnelt-Leddihn sound perfectly stringent and understandable. He talks about different sorts of causes (in a metaphysical sense) at the very end of the book, among other things.

Still, it was an interesting read. I think heavily influenced by the Stoics, what with Clement of Alexandria saying that the perfect Christian Intellectual (whom he calls Gnostic, but without there being any relation to what we nowadays call Gnosticism) has no passions, regards his wife - if he has one - as a sister and does not ever lust for her, only eats for sustencance, does not care about material wealth at all, and so on. He takes the asceticism very far, and like I said, I doubt he is solely informed by Scripture on that. Neither did he just bluntly copy the Stoics, however. For the Gnostic, he says, God should be sufficient, so that he won't need anything from this world. Man is patently not self-sufficient.

In all this, he never gives up his opposition to religious dualism. There are neitehr two gods, nor is the world that God created evil, nor can it be evil, being made by God. He argues this point forcefully. I don't think there is a way for dualists to avoid his argument, at least not on the basis of Scripture.

Some of the passages on numerology sound very far off. It's common knowledge nowadays that you can prove basically everything using numerology, if you use the right calculations. The exegeses were fine, but I trust Origen more, personally.

This book proves the critics of the Church wrong who say it was ever anti-intellectual. Far from that, Clement of Alexandria defends philosophy, going so far as to say it was a gift from God to the Greeks.

>>14534

Thomas Paine sounds like a faggot tbh.

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 No.14613

>>14534

>Synopsis Part 1: The OT is a bunch of fairy-tales. The book of Job doesn't fit in. The OT Jews were a bunch of ISIS-level savages, and the OT god was an evil bastard (who really hates jews).

Unless you don't want to offend Jews this is true, Judaism was a syncretic religion based on Greece, a local volcano and nearby Pagan Gods like the one's from Canaan. Taking this into account there were multiple reports of Jews killing people ISIS and Satanic Ritual style, from as late as 400 bc Greece, from philosophers mind you who would have no reason to be anti Semitic at the time. For whatever reason this pisses the Jews off a lot like they have the excuse of saying "Those traditions were ages ago." But they don't, they just get angry. Like they still do it and they never stopped so they want it hidden.

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 No.14626

Just finished Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction by Edward Craig. It's pretty entry-level but I finally understand what the hell dialectic in Hegel and post-Hegelian thought means tho. Dialectic = progress arising out of conflict

I also recently finished Excluded by Julia Serrano, which was cursed for personal reasons0, and Fluent in 3 Months by Benny Hill, which was useful but nothing you couldn't find online about language learning.

I'll get through The Stranger, and The Plague by Camus in a couple days at most, I'm halfway through both, and The Plague is pretty nice to read imo.

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 No.14627

>>14626

The Stranger is overrated in my opinion. I don't get why this book is so acclaimed.

I told someone this before and he told me that to really get it I need to read Camus' past work as well, which I'm not going to do, because I think a book's value should be determined by itself and nothing else, not on the book + the author's other work.

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 No.14633

File: 7e02ba617eb0a93⋯.jpg (33.95 KB, 270x400, 27:40, 6452538.jpg)

The Big Burn by Timothy Egan

Snappy prose, engaging, imformative, evocative characterizations. Very good read.

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 No.14645

>>14082

>March of titans

Reading the nordicist pleb is bad, lad. We wuzing is a degradation for the nordic race, you have (real) shit to be proud of, unlike the nigs

t. med

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 No.14646

>>14645

Nordicism is far truer than you could imagine, anon. In one of his poems, Theognis referred to the Athenian peasantry as blonde. This doesn't even begin to mention the Homeric heroes and gods and goddess having Northwestern European—Nordic—traits. History has proclaimed Greece and Rome's racial demise a tragedy.

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 No.14653

File: cd97ee6beaab7f1⋯.jpg (40.22 KB, 307x499, 307:499, 51KN9-IjGhL._SX305_BO1,204….jpg)

The Book of Five Rings by Miyamoto Musashi

A treatise on effective swordplay and battle strategy. My copy of the book had commentary, which suggested interpreting Mushashi's words as figurative advice for life. Essentially his philosophy boiled down to avoiding attachment to a particular process and instead taking initiative and utilizing the correct method (which will vary) for dealing with each individual problem. A quick read, but didn't hold my attention as well as I expected it to. Also, the translation probably fails to capture the nuance of words in Japanese.

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 No.14654

File: 2362b96d67043af⋯.jpg (63.58 KB, 592x541, 592:541, FEED THE MURDERCOCK.jpg)

>>14653

>Was planning on reading this

>Someone already read it before me within the same year.

Time to hang myself.

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 No.14704

File: 735e9d34b493d06⋯.png (661.98 KB, 900x600, 3:2, 1064693_4_62918-carbon-ide….png)

Just finished volume 1 of this sucker. It's good, but super dense. It's taking me a while, which sucks, because the book makes me feel like shit about myself

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 No.14712

File: e6bbaa88946b12f⋯.jpg (144.03 KB, 296x475, 296:475, MI Finley.jpg)

File: 8031487be246a99⋯.jpg (204.21 KB, 1125x1500, 3:4, The Greek Commonwealth.jpg)

>>13968

'The Ancient Greeks' is a quick introduction to Greek history/culture (not including Byzantium). Only really for people who know nothing about the subject and want to read something by an authority. Next is 'The Greek Commonwealth' which is a narrative history that focuses more on political organization. The book was written in the 1920's so it just radiates old world learning and wisdom. Fifty pages of landscape descriptions in and it's everything I'd hoped it would be.

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 No.14760

File: 72dc7f1ced059af⋯.jpg (37.15 KB, 331x499, 331:499, The Jewish Revolutionary S….jpg)

File: f29056c9e382eec⋯.jpg (35.44 KB, 329x499, 329:499, Argonautica.jpg)

File: e9c1ae94aacd4e3⋯.jpg (120.13 KB, 767x1186, 767:1186, Theogony, Works & Days, & ….jpg)

File: 1e7a3089f4e6f94⋯.jpg (45.48 KB, 323x499, 323:499, Aeneid.jpg)

File: e17f77ab79bea31⋯.jpg (44.34 KB, 305x500, 61:100, Eclogues & Georgics.jpg)

I've finally finished:

The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit by E. Michael Jones

The Argonautica by Apollonius

Theogony and Works & Days by Hesiod and Elegies by Theognis

The Aeneid by Virgil

Eclogues and Georgics by Virgil

I also finished all of a series' light novels translated heretofore. I'm still undecided on what to read next of my backlog.

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 No.14771

>>14760

I forgot to mention that I read this:

ia801903.us.archive.org/23/items/jstor-1835889/1835889.pdf

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 No.14811

>>14771

>>14760

What are the priorities in your backlog? Let us decide for you

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 No.14817

>>14811

Well, right now, I'm focusing on the Greeks/Romans, with an intermittent foray into more modern books, and I selected and read Theocritus because of Virgil's Eclogues being inspired by him and Callimachus and now I'm reading Lightning and the Sun. But if you want to select out a book from the Greece/Rome section here:

http://pastebin.com/JqR1uw2y

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 No.14823

I finished "Brighton Rock" by Graham Greene some days ago. It was a bit interesting as a crime novel but I don't feel it was worth the time.

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 No.14837

>>13968

Animal farm, just to be able to say I did and refute liberal shit.

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 No.14838

>>13968

I'm really glad to see that this smaller board is still active. So many niche boards on here have just dried up.

I've been trying to read one book per month this year. So far:

Hitcher Hiker's Guide - Read this because people are autistic about this book. I don't know, I didn't find it funny like everyone said they did. Story was okay. I only read this because people keep making references to it I don't get.

The Maltese Falcon - This one was really good. It's about a detective that has to do a bit of work around a statue that's being illegally smuggled around. I think. It was good.

To Kill a Mocking Bird - I thought it was pretty good.

A Book someone Self published - Can't remember it, but was good.

Win Bigly - I liked Scott's last book, so naturally I purchased this one. It gives some pretty good insight into the inner workings of persuasion using a modern example of someone who is. I don't care for politics, just the psychology.

Influence (Robert Cialdini) - A Psychology book on how people influence us and how to use the tools, and prevent said tools from being used on us. There's some pretty good stuff you could use in here to say form better relationships with people too.

A Farewell to Arms - I never liked the last Hemmingway book I read (Old man and the Sea), so I thought maybe one of his other books might be better. Honestly, the story was okay, but there is just too much damn padding. You could cut half the book out and be left with the same conclusion. It's also hard to read (maybe I have a bad copy?). Unfortunately, read this over the summer and it took my two months. TL;DR Solider goes to war, falls in love with nurse, gets injured and spends lots of time with her. Goes through a transformation throughout the book as he sees people he knows suffer. etc.

Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson - Just started this, I like the way the guy thinks. If you don't know who he is, look him up. He wrote many essays on varying topics. I don't necessarily always agree with him, but I get what he's trying to say, and do agree with some of what he says.

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 No.14840

File: 967d8dff7b502c1⋯.jpg (1.18 MB, 1627x2560, 1627:2560, book.jpg)

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 No.14870

File: 1e47b560ec9a08c⋯.jpg (31.63 KB, 320x499, 320:499, public_burning_cover_book.jpg)

>>14277

>>14278

The first few DW books are very silly shallow parodies, the series really gets good with Mort and Small Gods and Witches Abroad, around there. Give it another chance. They aren't really wacky at all in the later books, actually he goes a little far in the other direction. WARNING the last final two books are bad as well, Pratchett's brain was going and we suspect someone helped ghostwrite those two.

I've been reading The Public Burning, I'm only 240 pages in but it's already become a favorite of mine. The satire of anti-communist hysteria and right-wing insanity has only become more relevant since this was published, while reading this I find myself thinking "wow this could have been published yesterday". Also it doesn't hurt that it's very funny. There are a few places where the author goes on waaaay too long with an established joke or idea that the reader already understands, and he just goes on and on for two pages…but those moments are rare. A+ satire would recommend.

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 No.14873

>>14817

You can never go wrong with Eurypides or Aeschylus

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 No.14881

File: d79b669f066667c⋯.png (20.11 KB, 300x200, 3:2, Colder than Cold.png)

>>14873

You're right, but I've already read them unfortunately.

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 No.14893

File: 48c848f873aafb6⋯.jpg (154.4 KB, 785x1200, 157:240, El Almuerzo Desnudo Willia….jpg)

Naked Lunch by Burroughs.

That was a waste of time, although some passages were nicely written, most of the work is just junkie's vomit. You must be really into drug culture to like this book.

Also, can anyone tell me what the fuck is that thing at the end of the fork in the spanish cover.

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 No.14900

I can't fucking read (non philosophy) books anymore. "Humankind" this, "mankind" that, "man does or does not". I'm currently trying to read Hayek, so far the only things he's written about are

1. man does not understand what he's created because society is not designed but evolved and it is too complex to understand

2. man needs freedom because it fosters creativity which creates progress (from certain brilliant individuals)

The Chinese had a lot of freedom during the Cultural Revolution, they were allowed to basically do anything. What did they do with it? Destroy art, kill and eat people. Africans have had a lot of freedom over the last several tens of thousands of years but they never used it for anything other than tribal rituals, sex and murder. But Hayek doesn't mention this, "man" needs freedom. I'm so sick and tired of this bullshit.

Anyway, for the last book I tried to read, it was Evola. Awful author, dropped the book after about 130 pages. Essentially, "there is an invisible force that can influence the universe and there is a special section of the population who can access said power through rituals, everyone else is doomed to an infinite soul loop that will end in permanent death, the special ones will rise to Valhalla/Heaven type of afterlife". If you disagree or if you dont understand the force/forces then you are unitiated and a non-special (a pleb), which therefore proves my theory right tee-hee.

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 No.14903

>>14900

Which Evola book was it?

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 No.14911

Books 1-4 of the Blackford Oakes series. They're spy novels written by William F. Buckley Jr. Most people remember him as a nerdy Republican in a bow tie who wrote a lot of editorials in the 80s & 90s, although he actually worked for the CIA at one point.

The descriptions of tradecraft are great, for obvious reasons. He also is much better at describing the political "big picture" behind the missions than most. The characters are really fake, especially women. The sex scenes are awful, and always have some kind of boner-killing political aspect:

>The hero has an affair with the queen of England and portrays it as revenge for getting flogged in his British boys' school

>The hero has to sleep with someone to avert a diplomatic crisis, and draws an analogy with the Dutch boy sticking his finger in the dam

>A character screws his girlfriend in the bedroom of Hitler's abandoned rail car with a giant swastika on the wall

Overall, I don't think I'll keep reading. I do think it's worth a go if you like spy novels. Book 3 ("Who's on First") is the best so far – I think Buckley was really terrified of the Russians when he wrote it.

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 No.14914

>>14903

Revolt against the modern world

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 No.14942

>>14914

Have you read any of his other writings before this. From what I know of Evola revolt is generally recommended as one of his books to read later. Mystery of the grail and metaphysics of war are supposed to be the best place to start.

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 No.14945

>>14942

I haven't read any other ones, I started with this one because it seemed the most interesting and relevant: "to lead a good life in the Kali Yuga you need to do this". The premise seemed good and other anons talked well of it.

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 No.14949

YouTube embed. Click thumbnail to play.

>>14945

The thing about Evola is that he is an elitist intraracially and always looks higher first and foremost. I myself haven't read any of his works yet, but he is right that—and this sounds extremely Calvinistic of him— there are those who are elect, so to speak, and are to be the leaders.

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 No.14957

>>14949

I believe the same and so did Hitler, but Mein Kampf details this in a much better way and it actually argues for a viewpoint.

>he has a calvinistic approach to arguing his views

that probably explains it (everything) then

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 No.14978

Last read Dead Souls by Gogol. I really liked the first part, but the second part, because of many pages missing, disengaged me. Although some of the parts that was not missing really did impress me and I think that if all the parts were together, then part 2 would be very good.

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 No.14994

Just finished the first Witcher novel 'The Last Wish'

It was ok.

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 No.15064

Portrait of Europe

Was an interesting read about a guys opinion on what makes Europe so unique. I would suggest it if you have a European background and want to understand a little about your motherland.

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 No.15083

>>14893

burroughs inspired use of heavy drugs in the 90s

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 No.15084

>>14900

we need more honest people like you in this world

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 No.15090

>>15064

which one? "Portrait of Europe: A New Barbarism" by Roberts?

or "The Illustrated History of Europe : A Unique Portrait of Europe's Common History" by Delouche?

or "Microcosm: A Portrait of a Central European City" by Davies?

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 No.15099

>>15090

My apologies, It was Delouche.

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 No.15104

>>14900

>from certain brilliant individuals

This is the fucking keyword, you reprobate. Chinese fucking killed every elite they had and they had to swim in their own shit in the few decades while their smart and rich kids–whom are now their leaders–had to be educated outside the state. Native Africans have the collective IQ of a 12 volt battery so them not doing much isn't entirely their fault. That'd be like blaming the retard next door for not inventing flying cars.

If you're smart and you're free, not only will you get far, people will get caught up in your wake. We know this to be true because this is what the fuck happened to the west. This is what happened to the Chinese prior to the purging by the Communist Party. This is what was happening in the middle east prior to Muhammad doing peyote.

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 No.15114

>>15104

>it's not africans' fault they're stupid

Hayek's argument is that a free society fosters creativity and progress. what you're saying is that freedom is useless if you're an African because they're dumb anyway which is also somehow not their fault. what I was saying is that Hayek's book is shit because it says "a free society fosters creativity and progress"

you're illiterate and you should go back to middle school so you can learn how to read

>chinese killed every elite they had

well except Mao and others in his circle. I guess the Great Leap Forward was a massive success then, society was free and the most brilliant individuals (Mao and company) shared the benefits of their own creativity and progress with everyone, which…makes Hayek right?

>free western people got far

no shit retard

>the Chinese got far before Mao

yeah, so far that they got destroyed by Japan in ww2, and so far that their best known philosophical system was created by a guy who lived around 500 BCE

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 No.15118

>>15114

>yeah, so far that they got destroyed by Japan in ww2

After decades of suffering an opiod crisis by those sneaky brits.

>best known philosophical system was created by a guy who lived around 500 BCE

If it ain't broke don't fix it.

>well except Mao and others in his circle.

They weren't enough to prevent his goddamn country getting purged the fuck out, so I dunno what you're on about here. Soviet Union had to help the damn chinks to get them back on their feet and even then they eventually embraced capitalism except and just added a totalitarian spin in it.

>Hayek's argument is that a free society fosters creativity and progress.

It does. Your problem is scale as whatever progress the nogs have made is not enough for you but it's progress nonetheless.

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 No.15120

>>15118

>argue people worldwide benefit from freedom

>chinks have freedom to do drugs

>they do drugs

<fuckin sneaky brits pumpin drugs into based Chinamen

make up your mind

>If it ain't broke don't fix it.

living in caves, eating natural organic vegetables and freshly killed organic meat wasn't broken. damn those fucking Newtons and Teslas fixing stuff that wasnt broken

>the nogs made progress nonetheless

we wuz wakanda n shit

>so I dunno what you're on about here

yeah, it was like that since you read my first reply ITT

>Mao's circle weren't enough to prevent the country being purged

Mao's circle wasn't numerically strong enough to prevent policies from Mao's circle from being put into action?

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 No.15123

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 No.15125

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 No.15137

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 No.15157

>>15120

>make up your mind

You're not free if your neighbor has enslaved you through drugs.

>living in caves, eating natural organic…

Wew lad. We were talking about the philosophy, way to take it to a whole new field. How far are you gonna move that goal post?

>we wuz wakanda n shit

What they have now is way better than the shit they used to live in before the white man showed them what's what.

>Mao's circle…

By purge I meant the hilarious starvation cycle they had to go through that wiped out 200 million of their insect """"people"""". Purge wasn't a good word of choice, to be honest.

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 No.15171

>>15092

This kind anon suggested I read Poor Folk, and eventually I did just that.

I thought I'd bump /lit/'s post count a bit by saying that I really enjoyed the book despite it being outside of what I would regularly read 'for fun'. I've never been into the 'social realism' genre and have never touched a book written in the format of a letter exchange but I believe this book has slightly widened my interests in literature. In the future I might look at a book with less disdain simply for focusing on realism.

However my bias towards fantasy is still very much fact.

I don't have much to say in the form of a review other than that I liked it a lot and read the first half of the book in a single spurt after picking it up one morning with nothing else to do.

Fjodor self-inserting as an already established author (in a bypassing mention where Makar criticizes a book that Varvara lent him) by the name of Fjodor Fjodorovitj was fan fiction tier but also amusing

Lastly Makar cucked himself.

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 No.15199

File: ab784d0b56d4eb2⋯.jpeg (287.84 KB, 1166x1750, 583:875, CultureofNarcissism.jpeg)

Culture of Narcissism by Christopher Lasch

I would not recommend it unless you are oriented towards details for the sake of details. He had no use attached to the information he provided. No remedies. It was pure observation with no point.

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 No.15209

12 rules for life.

going through with skin in the game

Albert camus 's The outsider

James joyce 's Dubliners

Doestevsky's Demons

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 No.15243

File: cc29fa48ff933c4⋯.jpg (252.13 KB, 1920x1080, 16:9, Live Alive.jpg)

The Haruhi books. The series' characters, taken individually, make good stories, but it never feels like they're a brigade. The first book keeps them separated as they switch places in the spotlight, which is how they stay most of the time. Towards the end, the rivals have the same problem; the main plot of the last two books is them using a poorly thought out plan while the heroes don't have one at all.

The best stories would be The Melancholy, The Sighs, The Disappearance, Bamboo Leaf Rhapsody, Love at First Sight, and Wandering Shadow, with The Intrigues, Editor in Chief, Lone Island, Live a Live, Where Did the Cat Go?, and The Day of Sagittarius comprising a second best tier. The Disappearance kino is as good as the book.

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 No.15272

File: 35cc42b423106fe⋯.jpg (421.26 KB, 1558x2433, 1558:2433, sartreimagination.jpg)

I began reading Imagination; a psychological critique by Sartre and I found it very difficult to apprehend. He states the different schools of philosophy and their approach in defining the image and its role in regard of thought construction. And then he proceeds to counterargument their positions. But I think that without a solid grasp of the concepts he wishes to criticize, the comprehension will be very altered. So could you recommend me some introductory books to read before returning to it ?

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 No.15292

>>15272

Yeah, take advice and concepts from the guy who thought he was being followed by a large invisible lobster. That sounds like a good idea. Sartre was a troll that proved humanity was stupid not to acknowledge his frank bullshit.

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 No.15293

>>15272

the yoko ono of philosophy

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 No.15298

>>15292

I just wanted to begin reading about existentialism and french is my first language. So I chose a french author. I don't know about what you're talking abot since it's my first book of his.

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 No.15307

File: 7b94df91d1d575c⋯.jpg (26.41 KB, 326x499, 326:499, Theocritus.jpg)

File: 106ba58039e8ff1⋯.jpg (27.04 KB, 333x499, 333:499, Lightning and the Sun.jpg)

File: 059af97b4fe1477⋯.jpg (27.97 KB, 323x499, 323:499, Cupid and Psyche.jpg)

File: 0d57df3869f8673⋯.jpg (27.37 KB, 327x499, 327:499, Pindar.jpg)

File: cb21665c9d82e25⋯.jpg (25.71 KB, 309x499, 309:499, Callimachus.jpg)

>>14760

Since this post I've read:

Idylls by Theocritus

The Lightning and the Sun by Savitri Devi

Odes by Pindar

The Tale of Cupid and Psyche by Apuleius

The Poems of Callimachus

I finally finished the last book on the 22nd. Of all the books, I'd say Theocritus and Devi I liked the most. "The Lightning and the Sun" is one of the best books I've ever read. What I found striking about it is how similar my views are to hers, whose views in turn aren't always concordant with /pol/'s, particularly the pagan element. The work by Apuleius was missing two pages (39 and 40) and is apparently an extract found in his work "The Golden Ass", which is fortuitous because I have that book anyway. After finishing the story, there was modern egalitarian commentary that impelled me to not finish it. Pindar's Odes were tediously laborious for me and may need to be reread some time in the future to truly appreciate them (although I liked one or two). Lastly, given the fragmentary nature of most Callimachus' works, it was nearly impossible to savor them; of them, "Hekale" and his hymns, particularly the one about Artemis, stand out. I've since started Arrian's Anabasis.

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 No.15325

File: a9d80cff25e0c8f⋯.jpg (40.49 KB, 300x480, 5:8, md18795445474.jpg)

File: b099e02911fd693⋯.jpg (616.66 KB, 1524x2339, 1524:2339, 91D4H9G3U L.jpg)

File: 5e52b745c7bf578⋯.jpg (116.96 KB, 316x475, 316:475, 34084.jpg)

File: 84cd494e4122932⋯.jpg (184.31 KB, 300x466, 150:233, Chesterton-Cov.jpg)

File: ff07d859a112d54⋯.jpg (30.28 KB, 220x365, 44:73, 220px-Neuromancer_(Book).jpg)

Recently read these.

Man who was Thursday is a fun farcical adventure with an interesting premise that's best discovered firsthand

The Waste Lands is another entertaining entry in the Dark Tower series. Personally I found the first two much more compelling, and the cliffhanger ending is a slap in the face, but it was good.

Sea Lord is a decent sailing-based thriller.

Satan in St Mary's is an interesting historical murder mystery.

Neuromancer is the quintessential cyberpunk book. My familiarity with the genre through the Shadowrun games made it an easier read than for the unitiated, but I also feel that said familiarity lessened the magic. Again, a decent read.

Overall Man who was Thursday stuck with me the most.

My current reading list is an abridged version of Gibbon's Decline amd Fall of the Roman Empire, Nixon's Six Crises, Dark Tower 4:Wizard and Glass, Thrawn Alliances and Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow. That'll probably last me a few months.

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 No.15357

>>15325

Steven King being a cunt has made it harder for me to enjoy his work.

On one hand I feel he's given way more credit then he should.

On the other hand, he's made good books too.

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 No.15468

File: 08e58497c9574ce⋯.pdf (4.33 MB, [Dezsö,_Andrea;_Grimm,_Jac….pdf)

File: f60b5d39a3d8b7a⋯.jpg (170.83 KB, 899x667, 31:23, complete-1st-edition-origi….jpg)

The original version, before the Christian zealot brother progressively censored and edited away the best bits.

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 No.15469

>>14482

I recently watched all 007 films up to 2005 and they were pretty disappointing. Hard to think they were considered masterpieces of their genre.

Ruth Goodman made a good point in one of her documentaries about the food and scenery porn on the books; the people reading them had access to neither, and lived vicariously through them.

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 No.15470

>>14838

>Hitcher Hiker's Guide - Read this because people are autistic about this book. I don't know, I didn't find it funny like everyone said they did. Story was okay. I only read this because people keep making references to it I don't get.

When I get shitty coffee or such, I remember this bit:

He had found a Nutri-Matic machine which had provided him with a plastic cup filled with a liquid that was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea.

There being a whole race of bureaucrats that will gladly dispose of an inhabited planet and all therein rather than change their plans.

Reading it because you feel like you have to is definitely the wrong frame of mind, it's more of a lazy summer weekend thing.

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 No.15498

File: a545bb28552d795⋯.jpg (63.45 KB, 306x475, 306:475, witt.jpg)

My first Bernhard

>you will never experience a genuine friendship

Why even live?

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 No.15502

>>14900

Here's a gem from that book that I read recently in chapter 9.

Hayek defines coercion earlier as "when one's actions are forced to serve the will of another", so freedom is absence of coercion.

He now says that a society in which all the jobs are shit (e.g. a town which all decent companies abandoned) and in which you are forced by circumstances to work inhumane hours for extremely low pay is a free society. He says it's "unfortunate" that such situations exist but that such a society is free and that this is desirable to any other state of affairs - e.g. a socialist government - because men still have the choice to starve, or to let their families starve (or they can choose to work one of the shitty jobs in town). As long as they aren't forced by one employer or another to work for him only and in the conditions given only, then the society is free and thus it's good.

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 No.15518

>>15502

It's right, because no one is taking away what little they have.

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 No.15536

>>15307

Cupid and Psyche didn't pick at me but The Lightning and the Sun sounds fantastic, I'll check it out soon.

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 No.15539

>>15518

I agree, it's a utopian society and I wish I could live in such a state/city.

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 No.15560

>>15539

Not having things taken away is always good, even for those who think or would like otherwise.

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 No.15566

>>15560

Not having things in the first place is even better - theft rate 0, tax rate 0.

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 No.15570

>>15566

Not having your own body is 100%.

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 No.15669

File: f4f3b979b55a4ca⋯.jpeg (8.45 KB, 220x121, 20:11, 634BAF6D-61DF-4B56-B15B-7….jpeg)

Just finished The Crying of Lot 49. It was better than I thought it would be, the nazi shrink shooting up his office was hilarious.

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 No.15690

I read The Origin and Development of Christian Dogma: An essay in the science of history. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/56279

It's really interesting. It's a good overview of the history and (as the title says) origin of Christian dogma.

The one I finished before that one was an amusing(to me) account of a learned man's visit to Nauvoo, Ilinois while it was being built.

A highlight is a merchant's tale of living in the area before the Mormons came, and what transpired after. Also how Joseph Smith talked, and his (mis)identification of a Christian scripture.

It's entitled 'The City of the Mormons; or, Three Days at Nauvoo, in 1842'.

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/36486

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 No.15727

Finished The Road Back l, sequel to All Quiet on the Western Front. Its from the early 1930s or 20s cant remember but I think it might be the ultimate novel for coming back from war. I dont think it has a lot of influence from any sources and it is fairly frank and gruesome. I did not like it as much as all quiet but its still good to see a losers perspective. Theres a bit of jew sympathy and they dont really delve into the aftermath just vignettes but overall 4.5/5

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 No.15794

I just finished The Call of Cthulhu and The Shadow over Inns mouth today. I rereading cthulhu, since I couldn't remember it well. It's over rated, which is a shame, since cthulhu is Lovecrafts poster boy. I liked The Shadow Over Inns mouth a lot more. The story was more interesting, and I liked the little twist at the end. Even if the twist did seem a little odd it added a flavor to the end

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 No.15849

File: 2ba304e14eb531b⋯.jpg (28.89 KB, 327x499, 327:499, 413PN6Sa0eL._SX325_BO1,204….jpg)

File: 7f192f77705ba10⋯.jpg (38.87 KB, 333x500, 333:500, 51TlSw3hd7L.jpg)

File: eef1dbc741124ec⋯.jpg (20.09 KB, 220x328, 55:82, 220px-SixCrises.jpg)

File: b9bf4326155048f⋯.jpg (41.35 KB, 291x400, 291:400, gibbon-decline-fall-roman-….jpg)

File: 039ba0a3edb3c9e⋯.jpg (35.27 KB, 310x475, 62:95, 5096.jpg)

>>15325

Update on my reading list:

Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - a rather frustrating book. Gives some nice insight into ancient rome, the different Emperors, the wars, the territories etc, but I feel it could've been much better structured. As topics changed from chapter to chapter, the chronology jumped all over the place, and so I was left a bit bewildered. Also gave only passing mention to the early years of the empire, though I guess that's to be expected in a book about the decline. Worthwhile, but not an easy read.

Nixon's Six Crises: Essentially a book selling Nixon as a man worthy of the presidency, before he was elected. Neatly summarises key parts in his political career, and a very easy read. I felt that simply having some of his speeches in there was unnecessary, being already familiar with most of them, but overall well worth it for a look at American Politics from 1945 through 1960.

Thrawn Alliances: I was disappointed by the lack of Yuuzhan Vong. The alternating between clone wars and Empire eras was sort of neat, but broke the flow of the story.

Dark Tower 4 was as interesting as its predecessors. A bit overlong, but a very large chunk of it is actually sort of a prequel origin story for the Gunslinger, so it can be forgiven for not progressing the story much.

Nixon's No more Vietnams: An insightful account of the Vietnam conflict from beginning to end. Biased, but in a refreshing sense in that it runs against prevailing anti-interventionist sentiment.

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 No.15875

File: 753bc4f407329c9⋯.jpg (31.02 KB, 312x499, 312:499, The Young Hitler I Knew by….jpg)

File: 5d3fb2331b346ff⋯.jpg (42.32 KB, 328x499, 328:499, Alexander the Great by Arr….jpg)

File: 49cc45fd0ab442d⋯.jpg (36.07 KB, 329x499, 329:499, Greek Lyric Poetry.jpg)

File: 9acbf3f380e1691⋯.jpg (37.65 KB, 326x499, 326:499, History of Alexander by Cu….jpg)

File: 23ae9c9479c87b8⋯.jpg (30.33 KB, 344x499, 344:499, Demosthenes Vol. 1.jpg)

>>15307

These are the books I've since read:

The Young Hitler I Knew by August Kubizek

Alexander the Great and the Indica by Arrian

Greek Lyric Poetry

History of Alexander the Great by Curtius

Demosthenes, Vol. 1 translated by J. H. Vince

The Young Hitler is biography by his childhood friend August who published it postbellum after hiding the manuscript and, because of this, the book reveals that Hitler had never wanted war. The biographies of Alexander were nice. I found Curtius' speeches better than those of Arrian's and at certain points it's narrative, particularly that of Philotas' trial. Arrian's is more complete as the first two books of Curtius' are lost. I think a synthesis of the two would create a definitive version. Greek Lyric Poetry was a quick read and incorporated Theognis' poems divided and categorized into authentic and apocryphal. It covers the 7th century to the 3rd century BC. I found some of Demosthenes' speeches difficult because of references to people, governance, legislation/legislative process, and history with which I'm severely unfamiliar and which the Loeb translation did an insufficient job in remedying. I have to say that the best speech of the volume was his Third Philippic, esp., when paired with the previous one On the Chersonese.

>>15536

Yes, it's an amazing book.

>>15849

Did you read an abridged version of Gibbon?

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 No.15876

>>15875

Yeah the Gibbon one was abridged. Most of Vol I and early bits of Vol II, I believe, with most of the footnotes removed too. And even then it was a fucking long read.

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 No.15988

File: 6e5591c70d5dd44⋯.jpg (316.84 KB, 800x1059, 800:1059, savage_children_800.jpg)

Savage Children is a political allegory transposing two rival gangs of children as Reds/Republicans and Blues/Democrats.

Protagonist, Bee, is caught between the two and tries to use each side to further her own goal of bringing down a predator, one who embodies the exploitation of child labor and lives in a glistening steel and glass corporate office (might be a metaphor for Apple or Amazon)

As a non-American this was a more entertaining introduction to the American political system and a pure capitalist economy.

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 No.16034

File: 2e94f2b4b656ab1⋯.jpeg (11.92 KB, 220x293, 220:293, 49209041.jpeg)

Circuits of the Wind. All three volumes. Top tier writing and I love the story: protag is a slacker who grows up in the online scenes of the 80's and 90's. BBS culture, usenet, early web. Having known at least some of this pre-911 internet, it was very nostalgic.

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 No.16100

File: 7fa39fd24d2fb04⋯.jpg (289.24 KB, 1200x1600, 3:4, s-l1600.jpg)

Just finished this little brain-bender.

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 No.16106

The last book I read was Arch of Triumph.. I like it a lot but there are some additionals to it. I need to write college essay about this book. I have enough knowledges for it but not enough writing skills. Paperell look like the best option in this case, what do you think guys? Cause it's really hard for me despite I like reading anyway.

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 No.16123

File: c849d06891cd975⋯.jpg (25.8 KB, 308x475, 308:475, Kleist.jpg)

I mostly finished reading The Marquise of O and Other Stories by Heinrich Von Kleist. As much as I hate to admit this /lit/, I'm giving up on short stories collections. They're mostly mixed bags in my experience, were I only enjoy a couple of the stories and slog through the rest. Of the stories in the collection the only one I enjoyed was Michael Kohlhaas. Besides my disinterest in short story collections, I just don't find Kleist to be compelling as a writer. This might be a product of his time, but Kleist's prose is a tad flowery. You can skim paragraphs and not miss anything needed to move the plot or character development.

I'm not too sure what I'm going to read next. I'm either going to continue with my "light" reading or go back to reading philosophy.

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 No.16140

I'm in the last 50 pages of Simon Sebag Montefiore's biography on Stalin.

Montefiore is regarded as a second class historian so I will be reading through Stephen Kotkin's books after this and not bothering with the rest of Montefiore's stuff which is supposedly sympathetic to apocryphal evidence and hagiography.

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 No.16142

File: 968de02298112a3⋯.jpg (219.98 KB, 777x826, 111:118, Gree-01.jpg)

The sign of the four, the second book about sherlock holmes. The book features, among other things, the first instance of Holmes drug addiction, Watson finding love, poison darts, a boat chase down the themes and a chest containing an Indian treasure.

I am unsure if I'll continue with Sherlock Holmes. So far, the characters dosn't seem to change all that much between stories, I might read the dog of Baskerville or I might start on Agatha Christie. Also, Holmes never wore the stupid hat.

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 No.16179

Started getting back into reading over the past few months since I quit as a teenager.

The last book I finished is The Name of the Wind, which I heard somewhere was supposed to be really good.

I personally don't get it.

Kvothe is so fucking boring to read about. What can't he do? He's awesome at magic, awesome at acting, awesome at music, awesome at learning, and it looks like he's going to be some god-tier fighter later as well. Also, will he ever fucking shut up about Denna? It felt so sappy especially around the end when he's talking about how these other men will 'never understand her' like he does or some shit. It's so asinine.

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 No.16181

File: 79e477f5d73dfbf⋯.jpg (24.59 KB, 250x350, 5:7, Dune-Frank_Herbert_(1965)_….jpg)

File: 5bb6e4ac0411bfb⋯.jpg (15.91 KB, 250x296, 125:148, Dune_Messiah-Frank_Herbert….jpg)

Dune books 1 & 2

As a fan of the original Star Wars EU, I was aware that some people cited Dune as an influence on the original Star Wars films. A lot of elements were there - the rolling deserts, the evil antagonist which is actually revealed to be a direct relative of the protagonist, the death of a father figure and the protagonist's use of a supernatural power, in this case spice precognition rather than the force. The one thing that hit me as a fan of the EU, however, was that Dune influenced one of my favourite EU novels, A.C. Crispin's excellent Paradise Snare, with the Glitterstim spice granting telepathy rather than precognition, and in Jedi Search (written by KJA. Yes, him) it was revealed that the spice was produced by giant spiders rather than giant worms.

Now, the books themselves. One wonders how Frank Herbert could make a series of books about a bunch of people on a single, primitive planet that consists of little more than an endless desert compelling, but he does. There is a real knack for keeping things from getting stale. The characters live. You can see their worldviews without it being hamfisted. It might even make you stop to think. It's great. Dune, the first, was initially disappointing to me. It appeared too formulaic. Evil conspirators kill a good man changing things for the better and usurp him. The survivors endure hardship and convince the downtrodden natives to fight with them, culminating in Paul Atriedes becoming Emperor of the goddamn galaxy and winning not one, but two pretty girls. To one he gives his hand, the other his heart and dick. It overall just seems a bit silly. But Herbert has engaging prose. He writes convincing characters. Paul is not only reluctant, but horrified by the unavoidable atrocities that will be committed in his name. But he takes power anyway. Because he thinks he can make things better, even at terrible cost. It works.

Now, Dune Messiah. To those who say Dune was meant to be standalone, I say that the sequels were inevitable. Even when Duncan Idaho was long dead in the first book, Herbert seemed to without reason keep mentioning the guy. The Idaho gholas were inevitable. Messiah is a short book. When you've become Emperor of the fucking galaxy, where next? The fall. In my mind it's comparable to the 1st and 2nd Dark Tower books. When your protagonist is just that unstoppable, you've got to cut them down to keep it interesting. Roland is poisoned and loses fingers from his dominant hand. Paul Muad'Dib is trapped by despair at his need to push forwards into a future he already knows ends badly, but he sees as necessary. Conspirators conspire, and the beginning of the saga of endless Duncans begins. I enjoyed it. I enjoyed Messiah so much I went straight to the sequel.

Will review books 3 & 4 soon too, have also read those.

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 No.16268

>>15307

i thought about reading the lightning and the sun but do i need to read the bhagavad first ? any one know a good bhagavad translation

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 No.16289

>>16268

You don't. It's kind of underwhelming.

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 No.16338

File: 23cc1aba4a81f59⋯.jpg (14.81 KB, 216x320, 27:40, 81d TYSCCFL._AC_UL320_SR21….jpg)

Has been a pretty good read. Coming up on the end of it. Fairly lengthy, but interesting and well written. Some of the things in it have been proven wrong, such as the khazar theory, but the book is old so it is forgivable.

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 No.16386

File: 8fdabfcf55bb02d⋯.jpeg (5.32 KB, 196x293, 196:293, download.jpeg)

Pretty easy read I got the concept that it basically says that overproduction leads to a surplus of product. and it talks about how humans or any animals that reproduce that once the parents die, the child takes it place or in the case of trees, deforestation once humans are gone, the forest repopulates. it states a case that seems anti-humanist but its humanist in the sense that it implicitly applies the Hegelian concept of "those that do not learn from the past are doomed to repeat it"

Cons: a little hard on the US, which is low hanging fruit at this point

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 No.16387

File: 1a826d754710470⋯.jpg (28.49 KB, 272x400, 17:25, 510J-wde9aL._AC_SY400_.jpg)

>>16386

Also read this (more of an essay)

http://www.anthonymludovici.com/ew_int.htm

Currently on pic related, stopping all readings of current books as listed

Until I finish it

Books in process:

Louis Ferdinand Celine - Death On The Installment Plan

Mitchell Holleubecq - Whatever

Thomas Hobbes - Leviathan (not bad, a little drudgery)

Jason Jorjani - Prometheus and Atlas

Karl O. Paetel - The National Bolshevik manifesto

Foucault - History Of Madness (this one is very good)

Adorno - The Culture Industry (kind of pretentious and annoying, might toss aside)

Jacques Ellul - The Technological System

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 No.16402

File: c66f2ce915933f8⋯.jpeg (48.19 KB, 400x500, 4:5, Geography of Sub-Saharan ….jpeg)

File: a4912d4a3eb871e⋯.jpeg (21.36 KB, 353x499, 353:499, Sorcery the Invocation of….jpeg)

File: e4d730dc5913477⋯.jpeg (26.83 KB, 324x499, 324:499, The Saga of the Volsungs.jpeg)

File: d697b2ecedc9f17⋯.jpeg (26.26 KB, 337x474, 337:474, Reading the Past Runes.jpeg)

File: 8946bcc4808d37a⋯.jpeg (16.61 KB, 318x318, 1:1, The Orion Mystery.jpeg)

Hey /lit/, saw your board listed up top although I've posted here once or twice before. I'll jump ITT to keep your board alive. I've been buying books lately faster than I can read them so I have like ten books right now I need to read. I'll post some books I've mostly read compared to the others.

I'd rather not write a review for each but I'll add a short sentence to say what they are about:

-The geography book was for a university course, it's about what you would expect of it.

-Sorcery is random ramblings of various occult topics that I would classify as a memoir.

-Volsungs Saga is a new translation but I did not read the Ragnar section yet.

-Runes is a historical book about runes, small book but very good.

-Orion Mystery is about the relationship between ancient buildings and astronomy.

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 No.16427

File: 99536e40e806075⋯.jpeg (15.82 KB, 420x683, 420:683, invisible.jpeg)

File: 71dd645854e9796⋯.jpeg (22.23 KB, 265x406, 265:406, five.jpeg)

File: 08117e5453f0922⋯.jpeg (18.86 KB, 267x400, 267:400, island.jpeg)

Got into HG well's recently. His books are a nice length for consumption on the train.

Invisible Man - Good book overall, but I was bored at times

The Island of Dr.Moreau - One of better books I've read in a long time. Highly recommend

Slaughterhouse five - A fictional book about the bombings of Dresden in WW2. Great humor, but the book has taken a weird twist. Still like it so far

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 No.16484

File: 3cac295ca0349d7⋯.jpg (1.23 MB, 1610x2458, 805:1229, neuromance cover art.jpg)

Neuromancer, since I never finished it years ago.

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 No.16485

File: af6bbdc79f57f7d⋯.jpg (163.13 KB, 736x625, 736:625, dune books.jpg)

>>16181

just ordered my lot the other day.

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 No.16492

How to Read a Book. It was not bad.

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 No.16501

I'm reading through a complete collection of all Lovecraft work currently

Last story I finished was The Tempel, was about a German WW1 submarine crew who finds a strange artifact on a corpse floating in the ocean, causing paranoia on the ship except for the iron willed lieutenant-commander denying any superstition

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 No.16507

File: 46bd629ae81a662⋯.jpg (1.03 MB, 900x1354, 450:677, The Temple by Les Edwards.jpg)

>>16501

Ah, I see you’re a man of culture as well.

Been toying with the idea of a “book club” similar to the film club on /tv/; going through Lovecraft’s fiction and doing a review/analysis of each story. ‘The Temple’ is one of my all-time favourites by HPL – very underrated and ignored because it doesn’t feature any of the eldritch abominations most people associate with Lovecraft. The eerie, oppressive mood and overall feeling of doom of the men hopelessly trapped in the submarine is great, and the added horrors of what the see swimming in the deep dark ocean outside the sub, and what they find on the ocean floor is superbly effective.

Gou Tanabe did an adaptation of ‘The Temple’ in ‘H. P. Lovecraft’s The Hound and Other Stories’. he has also done a two part adaptation of ‘At the Mountains of Madness’, and according to Arkham Reporter on YT it is the best Lovecraft-adaptation of all time: http://www.invidio.us/watch?v=uHn1WdXOcnA

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 No.16536

File: d7c855fd62603ae⋯.png (524.27 KB, 480x800, 3:5, Night_Terrors_–_The_Ghost_….png)

Finished this collection of E. F. Benson’s ghost-stories spook stories a while back. M. R. James ranked Benson’s ghost stories highly, but accused him of sometimes “stepping over the line of legitimate horridness”. IMHO that is not all that accurate, as I found that his stories lacked that final stab of horror you tend to get in James’ stories. The ghosts are more often actual ghosts, instead of the elementals, daemons or enteties that are far harder to categorise in James’ own stories. I believe James could be alluding to Benson’s depiction of atrocities like suicides, murder, and cruelty.

Benson’s protagonists are also very sociable and outdoor types, who enjoy bathing in the ocean, hiking, skiing, ice skating, playing golf, driving motorcars, and hunting. They are bachelor gentlemen who enjoy their surroundings with close friends, playing golf and bridge and staying at seaside towns in peace and quiet during the silly season. His female characters are rare, but when they occur they are fleshed out and interesting, and there is even a female protagonist on occasion.

In terms of writing-style, Benson uses a richer, more colourful language than James – the dialogue is also better and more natural IMHO. His stories are also more often set in the then present day, and they are much more varied – his stories includes ghosts, elementals and vampires and undead ghouls from the grave. Some are science-fiction-esque, and there is mention of Einstein’s theories of space and time as well.

Like with James I did pick up certain recurring themes, plot ideas, characters and names in his stories; the limping ghost, a ghost who takes its time approaching and entering a house, the ghostly apparitions of someone who has committed suicide by slitting their throat, and some philosophical ideas about time and ghosts. Séances and spiritualism are also common topics, which is understandable given the time these stories were written.

My favourite spook stories by E. F. Benson:

The Room in the Tower – Vampire story

How Fear Departed from the Long Gallery – Quite a sweet story, but one scene of body horror is quite revolting and terrifying

Caterpillars

The Man Who Went Too Far – A favourite of H. P. Lovecraft

Between the Lights

Outside the Door

The Other Bed

The Thing in the Hall

The House with the Brick-Kiln

“And the Dead Spake…” – Similar to H. P. Lovecraft’s ‘Herbert West — Reanimator’

The Outcast – References the myth of the Wandering Jew?

Negotium Perambulans – Very fine story; another favourite of H. P. Lovecraft, and feels like a blend of HPL & MRJ

Mrs Amworth – Very fine and eerie vampire story. Underrated! Adapted two times (1975 & 2008)

The Horror-Horn – Very interesting and fine story with several allusions to the works of Friedrich Nietzsche

The Face – Female protagonist! Features the motif of a eerie recurring dream

“And No Birds Sing” – Very good and eerie story; feels very Jamesian, and features an elemental similar to the one in ‘Negotium Perambulans’

The Temple – Truly great! Very interesting mystery. Another Cornwall setting, with two gentlemen friends looking for the remnants of a prehistoric Stonehenge circle

The Wishing-Well – Witchcraft in Cornwall

Pirates – A wonderfully melancholic, sweet and deeply personal and semi-autobiographical story

The Sanctuary – Comfy setting & eerie atmosphere; very underrated story about Satanism/Devil worship & ghosts

http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/b/benson/ef/

http://archive.org/stream/spookstories00bensuoft

http://vaultofevil.proboards.com/thread/1906/benson-more-spook-stories

http://vaultofevil.proboards.com/thread/5013/benson-night-terrors-ghost-stories

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 No.16539

>>16536

I'm intruiged. How does his writing style compare to Lovecraft's?

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 No.16541

File: 72b7a9012ac899e⋯.jpg (5.1 MB, 4000x3000, 4:3, negotium_perambulans_by_ch….jpg)

>>16539

“Lovecraft’s prose style has engendered widely divergent judgments, from the towering condemnation of Edmund Wilson to the adulation of his colleagues and disciples, who have sought to imitate (usually in vain) both his stylistic richness and his verbal witchery. Put very simply, Lovecraft’s style is a melding of scientific realism and evocative prose-poetry. One is certainly free to dislike the style and to prefer the spareness of Hemingway or Sherwood Anderson; but it would be difficult to deny its appropriateness for Lovecraft’s type of imaginative effect. At its best Lovecraft’s work becomes a kind of incantation, seducing the mind into a momentary acceptance of the fantastic incidents being related. At worst it becomes pompous and bombastic.”

— S. T. Joshi in the Introduction to his annotated “The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories”

Benson is more “modern” and less “dense” than Lovecraft in writing-style, but he is no less colourful and enchanting, and there are some beautiful and some ghastly parts that stick with you long after you’ve closed the book. Unlike Lovecraft he doesn’t use the story within a story within a story narrative device, where a character finds a document telling a story of a story that author had heard. There is less purple prose (“evocative prose-poetry”), but a more refined, to-the-point technique. Quite a few of his spook stories are satirical and take shots at fraudulent mediums and the public’s perception of ghosts. Think the style Lovecraft used for the hotel and subsequent chase scenes in ‘The Shadow Over Innsmouth’.

Some of the elementals that appear are quite Lovecraftian in their description, but there is no sense of cosmic dread at the end. Instead of some uncaring, malevolent entity threatening humanity at large, there tends to be a vengeful spirit or elemental. Quite a few stories concern two gentlemen spending holidays at some sea-side town and them being the witness to some vengeful ghost seeking revenge on someone. Often the protagonist and his friend(s) are observers to this revenge. In his best stories he makes the protagonist more involved and brings them into direct contact with unseen forces of malice.

Benson, like M. R. James, wrote traditional ghost stories – standalone stories meant to spook the reader, rather than the more difficult, esoteric cosmic horror and dense writing-style of Lovecraft. James’ stories were meant to be read aloud at Christmas, perhaps Benson’s were as well. His spook stories often follow the same structure and “rules” of M. R. James – establishing a comfy atmosphere with characters who enjoy themselves, and then introducing the malevolent force. Some stories suffer from being predictable, but at his best his stories feel more natural than James’ antiquarian ghost-stories.

If you want stories that are closest to Lovecraft in terms of themes, I’d recommend these:

Caterpillars

The Man Who Went Too Far

Between the Lights

The Thing in the Hall

“And the Dead Spake…”

Negotium Perambulans

The Horror-Horn

“And No Bird Sing”

The Temple

The Sanctuary

I first encountered Benson’s stories in a collection called ‘The World’s Best Ghost Stories’. Two of his stories were included: The Man Who Went Too Far & Negotium Perambulans. I would probably recommend you start with Negotium Perambulans – it has a very Lovecraftian eldritch elemental, and makes you familiar with Benson’s writing-style at the same time. “And No Bird Sing” is another great story to start off it.

Negotium Perambulans was covered a while back in an episode of A Podcast to the Curious: http://www.mrjamespodcast.com/2019/03/episode-70-negotium-perambulans-by-e-f-benson/

You can find free, professional readings of several of Benson’s spook stories available for download here: http://corvidae.co.uk/benson/

“These stories have been written in the hopes of giving some pleasant qualms to their reader, so that, if by chance, anyone may be occupying in their perusal a leisure half-hour before he goes to bed when the night and house are still, he may perhaps cast an occasional glance into the corners and dark places of the room where he sits, to make sure that nothing unusual lurks in the shadow. For this is the avowed object of ghost-stories and such tales as deal with the dim unseen forces which occasionally and perturbingly make themselves manifest. The author therefore fervently wishes his readers a few uncomfortable moments.”

— E. F. Benson

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 No.16549

Red Badge of Courage. Does anybody have any thoughts on this book?

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 No.16550

File: 35c50ddfec77c40⋯.pdf (1.3 MB, 1984.pdf)

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 No.16564

Red Badge of Courage. Does anyone have any thoughts on this book?

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 No.16572

File: e4fa92a656b77b8⋯.jpg (23.36 KB, 263x400, 263:400, 51Ny1EefjyL._AC_SY400_.jpg)

Sorry for making a new thread; I meant to post this here. I'm reading this. The writing is dry. Does anybody have any suggestions for books about the Russian Revolution?

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 No.16573

>>15468

Can you provide an example of something that would have been censored?

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 No.16641

just re-read Gold in The Furnance pretty good account of post-war Germany and The allies's occupation. A bit too much Hindu stuff but I see where of fits in, alot of religons have similar themes of the natural order but Natsoc can be a religion in it's self so I don't see the point.

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 No.16647

>>14840

Muh niggaaa!

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 No.16661

File: 22ff6f3c16b1618⋯.png (577.95 KB, 522x800, 261:400, Nine_Ghosts_by_R._H._Malde….png)

File: a5f4098007adb38⋯.png (165.2 KB, 534x800, 267:400, Nine_Ghosts_(2010_reprint)….png)

After finishing E. F. Benson’s collection of ghost stories I was on the lookout for more classic ghost stories, and this 1943 collection of nine stories by Richard Henry Malden caught my attention. The nine stories in his collection “were written at irregular intervals between the years 1909 and 1942.”

Devotees of M. R. James antiquarian ghost-stories will be very pleased with this collection, as Malden’s stories are very much in the vein of the Jamesian antiquarian ghost-stories; male bachelor protagonists with antiquarian and genealogical interests and a love for old country houses and church architecture, Latin inscriptions, old documents, brass rubbings in churches…

Like James, Malden attended Eton & King’s College, Cambridge, and his love of the past is obvious from the first, and earliest, story in the volume. James & Malden were lifelong friends, and Malden acknowledges James as a source of inspiration in his preface. There are several similarities in the stories that carry over from James’ to Malden’s stories, and two bits in particular must be deliberate nods to James.

The two finest stories in the collection would IMHO be The Dining-room Fireplace & The Sundial. These are top notch. A Collector’s Company, Stivinghoe Bank, Between Sunset and Moonrise, The Blank Leaves & The Thirteenth Tree are also very fine ghost-stories that are well worth a read, and some of the best antiquarian ghost-stories we are likely to find.

In fact, the only stories I found somewhat lacking in that final stab of horror/“Jamesian wallop” would be the two last stories in the collection: The Coxswain of the Lifeboat & The Priest’s Brass.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Malden

Nine Ghosts: http://archive.vn/TaR0I / http://web.archive.org/web/20181226113218/http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0605461h.html

R.H. Malden: http://archive.vn/wZwK

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 No.16669

File: 0a6cbf3a411ee84⋯.jpeg (915.6 KB, 1920x1439, 1920:1439, 6C20C078-9D76-49A1-80E8-E….jpeg)

We need to create a situation the next(?) administration won’t want to deal with. We must go protest in front of congress and draw the attention to us and not allow business as usual! We can’t allow totalitarians silence our voices and we need to make ourselves known!

The people totalitarians always imprison is the intellectuals. Intellectuals are always murdered and we must not forget that!

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